A study on the possible predictors for violent behavior in children

There is a solid body of evidence that points to parenting style as one of its main predictors. The objective of this work is to elaborate a reduced, valid, and reliable version of the questionnaire by Oliva et al.

A study on the possible predictors for violent behavior in children

A risk factor is anything that increases the probability that a person will suffer harm. A protective factor is something that decreases the potential harmful effect of a risk factor. In the context of this report, risk factors increase the probability that a young person will become violent, while protective factors buffer the young person against those risks.

The public health approach to youth violence involves identifying risk and protective factors, determining how they work, making the public aware of these findings, and designing programs to prevent or stop the violence.

Risk factors for violence are not static.

The Risk Factors of Poverty

Their predictive value changes depending on when they occur in a young person's development, in what social context, and under what circumstances. Risk factors may be found in the individual, the environment, or the individual's ability to respond to the demands or requirements of the environment.

Some factors come into play during childhood or even earlier, whereas others do not appear until adolescence. Some involve the family, others the neighborhood, the school, or the peer group.

Some become less important as a person matures, while others persist throughout the life span. To complicate the picture even further, some factors may constitute risks during one stage of development but not another.

A study on the possible predictors for violent behavior in children

Finally, the factors that predict the onset of violence are not necessarily the same as those that predict the continuation or cessation of violence. Violence prevention and intervention efforts hinge on identifying risk and protective factors and determining when in the course of development they emerge.

To be effective, such efforts must be appropriate to a youth's stage of development. A program that is effective in childhood may be ineffective in adolescence and vice versa. Moreover, the risk and protective factors targeted by violence prevention programs may be different from those targeted by intervention programs, which are designed to prevent the reoccurrence of violence.

Risk Factors Risk factors are not necessarily causes. Researchers identify risk factors for youth violence by tracking the development of children and adolescents over the first two decades of life and measuring how frequently particular personal characteristics and social conditions at a given age are linked to violence at later stages of the life course.

Evidence for these characteristics and social conditions must go beyond simple empirical relationships, however. To be considered risk factors, they must have both a theoretical rationale and a demonstrated ability to predict violence—essential conditions for a causal relationship Earls, ; Kraemer et al.

Instruments and Materials

The reason risk factors are not considered causes is that, in most cases, scientists lack experimental evidence that changing a risk factor produces changes in the onset or rate of violence.

Early and late risk factors for violence at age 15 to 18 and proposed protective factors, by domain Risk factors are personal characteristics or environmental conditions that predict the onset, continuity, or escalation of violence. The question of causality has practical implications for prevention efforts.A six-year study by Hart and Risley () that followed the outcomes of children selected from different socioeconomic backgrounds found that by age 3, the children of professional parents were adding words to their vocabularies at about twice the rate of children in welfare families.

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Or download our app "Guided Lessons by caninariojana.com" on your device's app store. Aggressive & Violent Behavior (In terms of adults with mental illness) Vicki Notes. By an estimated 25% increase in admissions of violent clients to specialty mental health facilities will occur.

Antisocial behavior is strongly associated with academic failure in adolescence. There is a solid body of evidence that points to parenting style as one of its main predictors.

The objective of this work is to elaborate a reduced, valid, and reliable version of the questionnaire by Oliva et al.

In their meta-analysis of 34 prospective longitudinal studies of the development of antisocial behavior, Lipsey and Derzon () found that having an antisocial parent or parents was one of the strongest predictors of violent or serious delinquency in adolescence and young adulthood (see Table 1).

A study on the possible predictors for violent behavior in children

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Risk & Protective Factors for Violent Behavior - Violence